July 16th, 2013

If you could only read three stories on the Zimmerman/Martin trial…

In a swarm of media coverage on the outcome of the Zimmerman/Martin trial, what three stories would you recommend?

In a swarm of media coverage on the outcome of the Zimmerman trial, what three stories would you recommend?

The aftermath of the ‘not guilty’ verdict in the George Zimmerman trial has (rightly, methinks) been dominating the media. So much writing has been spilled on the subject, and my brain is so fried from this New York heat wave, that I don’t have anything to say on the topic which hasn’t already been said by someone. However, the story is too insignificant for this space to remain empty, so in the interest of helping you sift through the noise, here are some of my own must-read recommendations for coverage of the verdict and what it all means:

Emily Bazelon over at Slate nails it when she says that although Zimmerman’s not guilty, Florida sure is. It’s pretty infuriating that he didn’t have to break any laws to do what he did. Also, note that she refers to a legal system, not a justice system.

Salon‘s Mary Elizabeth Williams puts the ruling in context in this piece about “America’s summer of hate.” Years from now, historians might find the statement is a bit hyperbolic to describe the same season in which DOMA was struck down. Still, it’s hard to disagree with her that the balance of stories this summer have so far centered on hate and prejudice, rather than love and acceptance.

Finally, check out The Daily Show‘s take on the ruling for some “not funny like in a ha-ha way” humor and analysis:

Now, I recognize that there are many other excellent stories and videos out there about the case, the trial, the verdict, racism and much more, but I’m just one person. So tell me in the comments: If people could only take in three stories on the Martin/Zimmerman trial, what would you have them read, hear or watch?

– Emily Long

Follow The LAMP on Twitter: @thelampnyc
Follow me on Twitter: @emlong

 

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